Qmetrics Honors Sixth Annual Day of Radiology

QNotes, Vol. 6, Issue 14

The sixth annual International Day of Radiology is celebrated on November 8. Its aim is to build greater awareness of the value that radiology contributes to safe patient care, and improving understanding of the vital role radiologists play in the healthcare continuum. In honor of this recognition, a Qmetrics team radiologist provides his reflections upon the field.

Joshua M. Farber, MD

Joshua M. Farber, MD

Joshua Farber, MD, is a Senior Medical Scientist for Qmetrics Technologies. Dr. Farber received his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1988, and then completed a radiology residency and Musculoskeletal Fellowship, both at New York University. He also completed an MRI Fellowship at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Farber has practiced clinically, taught at academic institutions and has extensive experience in research and publications in the field of MSK radiology.

When he began his career there was no connectivity in radiology, “We were looking at films on a viewbox,” Dr. Farber says. Since then, he has enjoyed seeing the technological advances in the field. MRI, which has been used clinically only since 1977, and reached widespread use by the end of the century, has become less expensive and easily accessible. “It’s more available, even in small communities, allowing greater patient access to MR.”

Also, “CT (computed tomography) became ubiquitous so quickly. The relative cost has come down and patients most in need have access to it.” CT was invented in 1972 by British engineer Godfrey Hounsfield of EMI Laboratories, England and by South Africa-born physicist Allan Cormack of Tufts University, Massachusetts. Hounsfield and Cormack were later awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for their contributions to medicine and science. The technology quickly became widely available for medical use.

Accessibility to quality radiological tools and expert radiologists is one aspect that Dr. Farber is glad to see. “With the web the way it is, imaging studies can be read by expert radiologists around the world. This greatly increases patient care, when a radiologist with specialized training can read films from a distance via the internet.”

In addition to accessibility, Dr. Farber describes how imaging modalities are becoming more powerful: “We can now extract functional as well as morphological information from MR scans.

Dr. Farber is excited about 3D modeling and believes it makes imaging more accessible to patients during doctor consultation, but isn’t sure it will have widespread use in clinical radiology. What does Dr. Farber see as the greatest use of radiology in the near future? “More and more functional information can be extracted from imaging. I see imaging being used commonly to identify biomarkers.”

Dr. Farber remains abreast of continuing advances in radiology as Special Advisor to the Editor-in-Chief of RadioGraphics, his work with Qmetrics, and as a reviewer for six peer-reviewed journals.

Pediatric Bone and Joint Day

3D Image of Biomechanical Abnormality due to ACL Injury

3D Image of Biomechanical Abnormality due to ACL Injury

QNotes, Vol. 6, Issue 14

October 19 is World Pediatric Bone and Joint Day, part of the weeklong observance of Bone and Joint Action Week. One issue that is of growing concern among physicians, parents and coaches is the rise of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in adolescents.

The American Association of Pediatrics (AAP) reports on a study that reviewed the incidence of ACL injury in patients ages 6-18 years from 1994-2013 (Beck NA, et al. Pediatrics. 2017;139:e20161877). The authors found an overall ACL injury rate of 121 injuries per 100,000 person-years with the highest rates in 17-year-old males (422/100,000) and 16-year-old females (392/100,000). Perhaps a more important finding was that over the 20-year period, there was an average annual increase in the injury rate of 2.3%.

The AAP encourages coaches and players to participate in injury prevention programs to lower the rate of ACL injuries. Qmetrics concurs that education and awareness programs can be highly beneficial in preventing ACL and other bone and joint injuries in adolescents.

World Spine Day

QNotes, Vol. 6, Issue 13

October 16 is World Spine Day, part of the Bone and Joint Action Week which is held annually October 12-20, with activities focused on disorders including arthritis, back pain, trauma, pediatric conditions, and osteoporosis.

Qmetrics joins the organizers to highlight the theme “Your Back in Action,” by encouraging physical activity and improving posture as part of good spinal health and prevention of injury.

3D Rendering of Spinal Malalignment

3D Rendering of Spinal Malalignment

“Through some of the research Qmetrics’ supports we see various spinal injuries or disease, such as in this 3D rendering clearly depicting a spinal malalignment,” said Edward Schreyer, CEO, Qmetrics. “We certainly support the organizers of World Spine Day and the tips they provide for preventing back pain.” Tips can be found at the World Spine Day website.

Bone and Joint Action Week is a week-long observance is a program of The United States Bone and Joint Initiative (USBJI), part of the Global Alliance for Musculoskeletal Health, a global campaign to improve quality of life for people with musculoskeletal conditions and to advance understanding and treatment of these conditions through research, prevention, and education. USBJI aims to raise the awareness of the increasing societal impact of musculoskeletal injuries and disorders; empower patients to participate in decisions about their care; increase funding for prevention activities and research; and promote cost-effective prevention and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries and disorders.

 

 

World Arthritis Day

3D Thickness Map - Knee Cartilage

3D Thickness Map – Knee Cartilage

QNotes, Vol. 6, Issue 12

October 12 is World Arthritis Day, part of the week-long observance of Bone and Joint Week. According to the Bone and Joint Initiative USA, Arthritis and other rheumatic conditions are the second most common musculoskeletal disease among adults and is the most common cause of disability among adults in this country.  It affects one in five adults in the United States, or an estimated 50 million people, including 300,000 children.  These estimates are expected to continue to soar, reaching 67 million by 2030. The most common form of the more than 100 different rheumatic conditions that comprise arthritis is osteoarthritis (OA).

Qmetrics has supported researchers, pharmaceutical and medical device companies, and clinicians who are striving to gain a better understanding of arthritis while developing therapies to treat the condition. “We’ve been proud of the data and information our medical imaging technologies have been able to provide to the scientific and medical community who are committed to improving the lives of those with arthritis,” commented Edward Schreyer, CEO, Qmetrics. “Over the years we’ve contributed to studies helping to better understand the disease, and we will continue to do so.”

Some studies include:

Schreyer continues, “Qmetrics’ 3D software allows various looks at cartilage and arthritic disease progression. We feel these different views may help our partners gain a better understanding to help them with their work.”

 

Qmetrics Joins Bone and Joint Action Week

QNotes, Vol. 6, Issue 11

Qmetrics Technologies is proud to support Bone and Joint Action Week, which is held annually October 12-20, with activities focused on disorders including arthritis, back pain, trauma, pediatric conditions, and osteoporosis. There are five special days during Action Week:

  • October 12 – World Arthritis Day
  • October 16 – World Spine Day
  • October 17 – World Trauma Day
  • October 19 – World Pediatric Bone and Joint (PB&J) Day
  • October 20 – World Osteoporosis Day
3D Image of Bony Hip from a Routine MRI Data Set

3D Image of Bony Hip from a Routine MRI Data Set

The week-long observance is a program of The United States Bone and Joint Initiative (USBJI), part of the Global Alliance for Musculoskeletal Health, a global campaign to improve quality of life for people with musculoskeletal conditions and to advance understanding and treatment of these conditions through research, prevention, and education. USBJI aims to raise the awareness of the increasing societal impact of musculoskeletal injuries and disorders; empower patients to participate in decisions about their care; increase funding for prevention activities and research; and promote cost-effective prevention and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries and disorders.

During this week, Qmetrics Technologies will contribute to the discussion about MSK research, prevention and education, with information an articles posted to it’s website and social media platforms. With the growing prevalence of MSK disorders and impact to our community, Qmetrics is pleased to support researchers, companies and medical practitioners striving for therapies and prevention for such disease.

Qmetrics’ 3D Medical Models Assisting Pediatric Cancer Patients

QNotes, Vol. 6, Issue 10

Children and adolescents aren’t immune from orthopedic disease and injury. Highly active and energetic, children do suffer sports injuries, and their cases can sometimes present challenges. One benefit of Qmetrics ability to develop 3D images and anatomic models from MR scans is that it can avoid radiation exposure in pediatric patients associated with CT scans. Additionally, the rich soft-tissue data found in MRI images may provide physicians with a better understanding of injury or disease extent.

Sample 3D Model from MRI

Sample 3D Model from MRI

The Qmetrics team is honored to partner with one of its clients to support development of custom orthopedic implants for young cancer patients. Qmetrics provided an accurate 3D model of the patient’s anatomy, enabling the client’s engineers to design and fabricate an implant customized for the patient. This application of advanced image analysis helps the patients’ physician pursue options designed to preserve the child’s limb while treating the cancer.

“Qmetrics is proud to be working with our orthopedic partners to help cancer patients receive the best possible treatment options,” commented Edward Schreyer, CEO, Qmetrics. “We realize the importance of making our proprietary technology available in a clinical setting so treating physicians can benefit from the rich information in medical image data to make better care decisions. We would be happy to work with clinicians facing these challenges, and facilitating conversations with our partners to help develop custom solutions for their pediatric and other patients.”

Qmetrics Technologies Announces Relationship with Medairum, a Service Based Provider of 3D Prints of Patient Specific Anatomical Models

Qmetrics Technologies is pleased to announce it is working with Medairum, a Singapore based service provider that leverages the power of 3D printing to deliver patient-specific solutions to improve patient outcomes. Medairum will send Qmetrics imaging studies, and with its proprietary software, Qmetrics will provide 3D data files of selected anatomy for Medairum to print using the latest 3D printing technologies available to them.

Image Sequence of 3D Printing from MRI

Image Sequence of 3D Printing from MRI

“It makes sense to work with Medairum and collaborate with our technologies,” commented Edward Schreyer, CEO, Qmetrics Technologies. “Our 3D Segmentation and Modeling services provide high quality 3D anatomical data, and Medairum has the cutting edge printing services needed to provide them to interested parties.”

“Qmetrics provides expert MRI image analysis and segmentation services turning traditional 2D data into highly visual 3D representations.” Commented Nirodha Ariyaratne, General Manager, Medairum Pte Ltd. “Together with Qmetrics, we can take an MRI scan and deliver highly visual and tactile 3D printed anatomical models. With these models in the hands of a surgeon, they can make better surgical decisions and communicate more effectively with their patients, leading to better patient outcomes.”

Qmetrics provides 3D Segmentation & Modeling service available to physicians, academic and industry researchers, educators and others interested in 3D segmentations of anatomy. The 3D segmentation and resulting models may be be useful to physicians in visualizing injury or disease and patient communication; build accurate finite models for tissue engineering, prosthesis design, etc.; for students to visualize or print clinical cases for presentation or publication; and even for the general public interested in learning more about anatomy.

For more information about the 3D Segmentation Service and how to submit a scan, contact Qmetrics at 3Dqmetrics@qmetricstech.com. Examples of the some models can be viewed here, or at the Qmetrics’ 3D Segmentation Facebook page.

About Medairum
Medairum Pte Ltd is a specialized service provider based in Singapore that leverages the power of 3D printing to deliver patient-specific solutions to improve patient outcomes. Founded by Miles Podmore, Medairum is the service branch of Eye2Eye Communications that has been providing hardware and software solutions to the radiology and 3D printing sectors in Singapore and Southeast Asia for 15 years.

For more information about Medairum, visit their website.

What’s Wrong with my Knee?

QNotes, Vol. 6, Issue 8

These two images are of an injured knee. This black and white image is the original MRI. Can you find what’s wrong? Please leave comments below.

 

This colorful image is the result of Qmetrics Technologies rendering the MRI into a 3D image. Can you identify what’s wrong in this one? Again, please leave comments below.

3D Image Full Cartilage Defect

 

As a patient, which would you prefer your physician to show you while explaining injury and possible treatment?

Qmetrics’ Senior Medical Scientist, Joshua M. Farber, MD, Appointed Special Advisor to the Editor-in-Chief of RadioGraphics

QNotes, Vol. 6, Issue 7

Qmetrics’ Senior Medical Scientist, Joshua M. Farber, MD, recently was invited to serve as a Special Advisor to the Editor-in-Chief, Jeffrey Klein, MD, of the RadioGraphics Editorial Board. RadioGraphics is a bimonthly journal published by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). The journal is devoted to continuing medical education in radiology. Dr. Farber’s term will run from March 2017 through the conclusion of the 2019 RSNA Annual Meeting.

Joshua M. Farber, MD

Joshua M. Farber, MD

In this position, for which Dr. Farber will be listed on the masthead, he will work to improve the clinical relevancy of appropriate published articles. He hopes to have clinically relevant articles include material concerning structured reporting. If the initiative is successful, elements of a structured report specific to the disease process under consideration will be published. Dr. Farber and the RadioGraphics team also hope to develop and implement a tie-in with the RSNA repository of existing structured report.

“It’s a great honor for Dr. Farber and for Qmetrics to have him serve in this capacity with RadioGraphics,” commented Edward Schreyer, CEO, Qmetrics. “It further establishes him as a respected radiologist, recognized worldwide by his colleagues. Qmetrics is grateful to have a physician of his caliber on our team.”

Dr. Farber is a board certified radiologist with nearly 20 years of clinical experience. He received his MD from the University of Pennsylvania and was a resident in radiology at New York University. He completed two formal fellowships, one in MSK radiology at New York University and one in MRI at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Farber’s last academic position was Vice-Chair of Clinical Affairs at Indiana University, but he continues to pursue his research interests. Recently, he has published abstracts and peer-reviewed articles on articular cartilage segmentation, with a focus on clinical applications. In addition to his work with Qmetrics, he remains active in MSK and MRI society work. He has been on numerous program committees for the ISMRM, RSNA and SSR. Dr. Farber reviews manuscripts for six peer-reviewed journals, and reviews abstracts for the ISMRM and RSNA annual meetings. For more information on Dr. Farber’s publications, click here.

Two Views of an Osteophyte

QNotes, Vol. 6, Issue 6

Qmetrics recently collected some test MRI scans taken to further research and development of automated segmentation technologies.

Upon performing the segmentation and rendering the MRI into a 3D image the team noted that one of the volunteers is shown to have an osteophyte on the medial femoral condyle.

The osteophyte is circled by the yellow oval and can be seen as a ridge or protrusion that is extruding from the medial edge of the condyle.

The osteophyte is circled by the yellow oval and can be seen as a ridge or protrusion that is extruding from the medial edge of the condyle.

MRI Image of an Osteophyte on the Medial Condyle

MRI Image of an Osteophyte on the Medial Condyle

In looking at the MRI image and the 3D rendered image, the osteophyte is circled in both. Osteophytes are bony lumps that grow on the bones and are common in older patients. They are part of the diagnostic criteria that a joint is affected by osteoarthritis, though may be in the early stages of the disease.

Having the MRI and 3D rendering side-by-side provides an excellent example of how Qmetrics 3D imaging capabilities can enhance communication with patients. Although commonly viewed in profile with a traditional MRI or X-ray, viewing them in 3D has only recently become practical in clinical settings. The bone spurs are much easier for a layperson to identify in the 3D rendering. This would indicate that for persons with no imaging background, a 3D rendering may be a better tool for physicians to use when explaining the diagnoses and treatment options for patients.

To learn more about the 3D imaging options Qmetrics offers to clinical practices, researchers and orthopedic manufacturers, please contact us.